YA Books and Their Adaptations

So this should have gone up in August, but with the stress of packing and moving, it’s only getting up now.

Apparently, 2018 is the year of the YA adaptations, and for the most part they have been pretty incredible. Love, Simon set the precedent, after years of mediocre adaptations that established a stereotype when it comes to this “genre” of movie.

Taboo Topics About Chronic Pain

“How much pain for how long is OK before it’s acceptable to just give up?”

Ever since finding the website the Mighty, I’ve had so many more instances of acceptance when it comes to my chronic pain. When you’re diagnosed so young—20-years old is pretty young for a life-long condition in my book—it’s easy to feel so alone. Unknowingly, you start to isolate yourself from friends and family and start to feel like no one else could ever understand how you feel.

The other day I came across an article on the Mighty titled: “18 Taboo Topics About Chronic Illness You’re Not the Only One Having.” It felt as if the dark and gloomy sky had opened up and the sun starting shining down on me. I was finally being heard. Here are some of my favorite topics that come directly from the Mighty community:

“I actually look forward to procedures that require anesthesia because I get to go right to sleep. That’s so sad to me.”

“[I worry] nobody will love me because I’m sick.”

“I think about how much I dread going to the doctor. I hope I have enough symptoms to have them believe me and take me seriously. But I don’t want enough symptoms and hurt going on to warrant a crash. It’s complicated.”

“I think pretty regularly that I’m a burden to everyone around me, and that if only I wasn’t sick. I have been known to think I would be better not being here, not that I want to die, just that my life isn’t exactly worth it because I don’t really do anything. I’m ‘failing.’”

“My taboo thoughts have always been that I hope my tests come back showing something. More clues as to what is going on or why it is happening. Most of my test results come back normal or just ever so slightly off. Nothing is ever off the charts or crazy enough to get the attention I feel I need.

“Any drug that makes me sleepy or slightly ‘stoned’ I love.”

“I feel frustrated every single day. Because the person I am now can’t even do 10 percent of the things I could do before I was sick. I’m constantly irritated and grouchy due to frustration.”

I no longer felt so alone. I’ve had some version of these thoughts ever since I’ve been sick. These aren’t things I can talk about with other people, especially people who have no idea what you’re going through. And to the outside world, I have a wonderful middle-class life filled with a supportive family, successful friends, and financial stability. But if you take the time to look closer, you would see that those successful friends don’t have time for you and that financial stability comes from your parents because you’re unable to work and provide for yourself. We try to put up a front, but on the inside our thoughts are dark and lonely. Knowing there are people out there that share your thoughts—share your pain—the world doesn’t feel so alone anymore.

Here is the original article if you would want to check it out~

Spring Book Festival Wrap-up

Every spring brings two book festivals to Southern California: The LA Times Festival of Books and Yallwest. Over the years attending these two festivals, I’ve been able to meet some of my all-time favorite authors and listen to them discuss their process, the hardships of writing, and the joys of meeting readers. This was my first time where my health and my body really limited my time and experience but I tried to make it work.  There was no way I was going to miss these events, as they are some of my favorite of the year. Without further ado, here is my wrap-up of the two festivals!

My Love of YA

I used to be ashamed of my love for YA literature. When I was twelve, I saw the movie How to Deal, a mash-up of two Sarah Dessen books starring Mandy Moore. I LOVED it. It still is one of my favorite movies. So after seeing the movie, I immediately bought the movie tie-in book that included, Someone Like You and That Summer. After I devoured those books, I went through Dessen’s entire backlog of books and I was hooked. Young Adult literature had grabbed at my heart and it was never letting go.

Isle of Dogs

When I was in one of film classes and we learned about how the auteur theory—a singular person who controls every aspect of the creative work, the true author of the film. Some famous examples include: Woody Allen, Steven Spielberg, and Martin Scorsese. When you see a film by one of those directors, you know exactly what kind of movie it will be.  The first name that came to mind when I was in the film class was Wes Anderson. He has such a specific way of filming and storytelling that you know he directed a film without first being told. He also casts his films with many of the same people, another aspect in the auteur theory.